Matthew D. Besser Cathleen M. Bolek Amy S. Glesius

Bolek Besser Glesius LLC

5885 Landerbrook Dr.
Cleveland, OH 44124
United States (US)
Phone: (216) 464-3004
Fax: (866) 542-0743

Monday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Thursday 
Friday 
Saturday 
Sunday 

Ask a Question

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

EEOC Warns Against Anti-Muslim Workplace Discrimination

Share Button

In the wake of the horrific Paris and San Bernadino attacks, a fair amount of ugly anti-Muslim rhetoric, and worse, quickly permeated some segments of the nation. Concerned that this backlash would unduly spill over into the workplace, on December 23, 2015, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission issued two resource documents. Both are designed to remind employers and employees alike that Americans of the Muslim faith or Middle Eastern national origin are entitled to the same freedom from employment discrimination as everyone else. [Read more…]

Share Button

High Court Reaffirms Right of Employees to Religious Accommodations

Share Button

Can an employee sue for religious discrimination due to an employer’s failure to accommodate religious practices when the need for the accommodation is obvious, but the employee did not explicitly request one? Yes, according to an 8-1 decision yesterday from the Supreme Court.

Back in October, we wrote about a pending Supreme Court case involving a Muslim woman denied employment by Abercrombie & Fitch because she wore a religious headscarf. Yesterday, the Court decided the case, holding that employers cannot refuse to hire applicants based on an assumption that they would require an accommodation due to their respective religious practices. The decision should help protect employees from having to choose between their jobs and their religious beliefs. The case is U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission v. Abercrombie & Fitch Stores, Inc. [Read more…]

Share Button

Freedom of Religion Case Filed by Bolek Besser Makes National News

Share Button

On December 18, 2014, the civil rights attorneys at Bolek Besser Glesius LLC filed a freedom of religion lawsuit on behalf of a young Muslim woman from Cleveland who was forced to attend Christian prayer services against her will by the Cuyahoga County Sheriff’s Department while incarcerated at the Cuyahoga County Jail.

Filed in the United States District Court for the Northern District of Ohio against Cuyahoga County, the Cuyahoga County Sheriff, and one of the offending corrections officers, the case has garnered national attention. The case is titled Majeed v. Cuyahoga County, et al., Case No. 1:14-cv-02778.

[Read more…]

Share Button

Supreme Court to Take up A&F Employment Discrimination Case

Share Button
Can employees bring a religious discrimination lawsuit due to an employer’s failure to accommodate religious practices if the need for the accommodation is obvious, but the employee did not explicitly request one? That is the issue the U.S. Supreme Court announced last week it would soon consider in a case involving a Muslim woman denied employment by Abercrombie & Fitch because she wore a religious headscarf. The case, EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch Stores, Inc., has the potential to be one of the most important of the year for employment lawyers who handle religious discrimination cases.

[Read more…]

Share Button

The Mayflower II and Religious Discrimination in Ohio Workplaces

Share Button

Anyone who remembers middle school history class knows the Pilgrims came to this country on the Mayflower in search of religious freedom. In honor of their quest, and Thanksgiving this week, it’s a good time to talk about religious freedom and religious discrimination in Ohio workplaces. [Read more…]

Share Button

Abercrombie Loses Important Religious Discrimination Case

Share Button

A federal court in California recently ruled that clothing retailer Abercrombie & Fitch violated the rights of a muslim sales employee by firing her for refusing to remove her religious headscarf. This ruling reaffirms an important principle set out by the religious discrimination laws: employees who can perform their job duties while still observing their sincere religious practices should not be forced to chose between their job and their religion. [Read more…]

Share Button